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Efrem Naumov
Efrem Naumov

Brush Up Your English by ST Imam: A PDF Book that Covers All the Essential Topics of English Language


Brush Up Your English by ST Imam PDF: A Comprehensive Guide




Do you want to improve your English skills and learn the basics of grammar, vocabulary, and usage? If so, you might be interested in reading Brush Up Your English by ST Imam, a popular book that covers all the essential topics of English language. In this article, we will give you a brief overview of what this book is about, why you should read it, and how you can download it for free as a PDF file. Let's get started!




brush up your english by st imam pdf free download



Introduction




What is Brush Up Your English by ST Imam?




Brush Up Your English by ST Imam is a book that aims to help students, teachers, and learners of English to master the fundamentals of the language. It is divided into 15 chapters, each focusing on a different aspect of grammar, such as the sentence, the noun, the verb, the adjective, the adverb, the preposition, the conjunction, the article, the interjection, the punctuation, the spelling, the vocabulary, the idioms, the letter writing, and the composition. Each chapter contains clear explanations, examples, exercises, and tests to help you understand and practice the rules and concepts.


Why should you read Brush Up Your English by ST Imam?




There are many reasons why you should read Brush Up Your English by ST Imam if you want to improve your English skills. Here are some of them:


  • It covers all the basic and important topics of grammar that you need to know to communicate effectively in English.



  • It provides simple and easy-to-follow explanations that make learning fun and enjoyable.



  • It offers plenty of examples and exercises that help you apply what you learn in real-life situations.



  • It includes tests and quizzes that help you check your progress and identify your strengths and weaknesses.



  • It helps you expand your vocabulary and learn common idioms and expressions that enrich your speech and writing.



  • It teaches you how to write different types of letters and compositions that suit various purposes and audiences.



How to download Brush Up Your English by ST Imam PDF for free?




If you are interested in reading Brush Up Your English by ST Imam, you might be wondering how you can get a copy of it for free. Well, there are several websites that offer free downloads of this book as a PDF file. However, not all of them are reliable or legal. Some of them might contain viruses or malware that can harm your device or compromise your privacy. Some of them might also violate the copyright laws and infringe the rights of the author and the publisher. Therefore, you should be careful and cautious when choosing a website to download this book from.


One of the websites that we recommend is Documents and E-books, which is a platform that allows users to upload and share various types of documents and e-books. You can find Brush Up Your English by ST Imam PDF on this website by following this link: https://idoc.pub/documents/brush-up-your-english-st-imampdf-6ng22g77m2lv. This link will take you to a page where you can preview the book and download it by clicking on the "Download" button. The file size is about 18 MB and the number of pages is 479. You can also read the book online by scrolling down the page.


Another website that we recommend is Scribd, which is a digital library that hosts millions of books, audiobooks, magazines, podcasts, sheet music, documents, and snapshots. You can find Brush Up Your English by ST Imam PDF on this website by following this link: https://www.scribd.com/document/403223114/Brush-Up-Your-English-ST-Imam-pdf. This link will take you to a page where you can preview the book and download it by clicking on the "Download" button. The file size is about 18 MB and the number of pages is 479. You can also read the book online by scrolling down the page.


However, to download or read the book on Scribd, you need to sign up for a free trial or a paid subscription. The free trial lasts for 30 days and gives you unlimited access to all the content on Scribd. The paid subscription costs $9.99 per month and also gives you unlimited access to all the content on Scribd. You can cancel your subscription at any time.


Main Body




Chapter 1: The Sentence




Types of sentences




A sentence is a group of words that expresses a complete thought. There are four types of sentences based on their purpose: declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory.


  • A declarative sentence makes a statement or gives information. It ends with a period (.). For example: The sky is blue.



  • An interrogative sentence asks a question or requests information. It ends with a question mark (?). For example: What is your name?



  • An imperative sentence gives a command or makes a request. It ends with a period (.) or an exclamation mark (!). For example: Close the door. or Stop!



  • An exclamatory sentence expresses strong emotion or surprise. It ends with an exclamation mark (!). For example: Wow! That was amazing!



Parts of speech




A part of speech is a category of words that have similar functions or roles in a sentence. There are eight parts of speech in English: noun, pronoun, adjective, verb, adverb, preposition, conjunction, and interjection.


  • A noun is a word that names a person, place, thing, or idea. For example: Ali, school, book, love.



  • A pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun or another pronoun. For example: he, she, it, they.



  • An adjective is a word that modifies or describes a noun or a pronoun. For example: big, red, beautiful, smart.



  • A verb is a word that shows an action or a state of being. For example: run, sing, be, have.



  • An adverb is a word that modifies or describes a verb, an adjective, or another adverb. For example: quickly, very, well, here.



  • A preposition is a word that shows the relationship between a noun or a pronoun and another word in the sentence. For example: in, on, under, with.



  • A conjunction is a word that joins two words, phrases, or clauses together. For example: and, but, because, although.



```html expresses a sudden emotion or feeling. For example: ouch, wow, hey, ouch.


Subject and predicate




A subject is the part of a sentence that tells who or what the sentence is about. A predicate is the part of a sentence that tells what the subject does or is. For example: She sings well. In this sentence, she is the subject and sings well is the predicate.


A subject can be a noun, a pronoun, or a phrase that acts as a noun. A predicate can be a verb, an adjective, a noun, or a phrase that acts as one of these. For example: The boy in the blue shirt is my brother. In this sentence, the boy in the blue shirt is the subject and is my brother is the predicate.


Chapter 2: The Noun




Kinds of nouns




A noun can be classified into different kinds based on its meaning or function. There are five kinds of nouns in English: common, proper, collective, abstract, and concrete.


  • A common noun is a noun that names any person, place, thing, or idea of the same kind. For example: man, city, book, happiness.



  • A proper noun is a noun that names a specific person, place, thing, or idea. It usually begins with a capital letter. For example: Ali, Karachi, Quran, Islam.



  • A collective noun is a noun that names a group of people or things. For example: family, team, flock, herd.



  • An abstract noun is a noun that names an idea, quality, state, or action that cannot be seen or touched. For example: love, beauty, peace, courage.



  • A concrete noun is a noun that names something that can be seen or touched. For example: table, flower, water, ball.



Number and gender




A number is a grammatical category that shows whether a noun is singular or plural. A singular noun names one person, place, thing, or idea. A plural noun names more than one person, place, thing, or idea. For example: cat - cats; child - children; mouse - mice.


A gender is a grammatical category that shows whether a noun is masculine or feminine. A masculine noun names a male person or animal. A feminine noun names a female person or animal. For example: boy - girl; lion - lioness; king - queen.


Some nouns have the same form for both singular and plural or for both masculine and feminine. For example: sheep - sheep; fish - fish; deer - deer; teacher - teacher.


Case and declension




A case is a grammatical category that shows the function or relationship of a noun in a sentence. There are three cases in English: nominative (or subjective), objective (or accusative), and possessive (or genitive).


  • A nominative case noun is used as the subject of a verb or as a complement of a linking verb. For example: He likes pizza. or It is he.



  • An objective case noun is used as the object of a verb or a preposition. For example: I saw him. or I gave it to him.



  • A possessive case noun shows ownership or possession of something. It usually has an apostrophe (') and an s at the end. For example: This is his book. or This book belongs to him.



```html there are only two declensions: regular and irregular. A regular declension noun forms its plural by adding an s or an es and its possessive by adding an apostrophe and an s. For example: book - books - book's; box - boxes - box's. An irregular declension noun forms its plural and possessive in different ways. For example: man - men - man's; child - children - child's; mouse - mice - mouse's.


Chapter 3: The Pronoun




Personal pronouns




A personal pronoun is a pronoun that takes the place of a specific person or thing. There are three types of personal pronouns based on their person, number, and case: first person, second person, and third person.


  • A first person pronoun refers to the speaker or the writer. It has two numbers: singular (I) and plural (we).



  • A second person pronoun refers to the listener or the reader. It has only one number: singular and plural (you).



  • A third person pronoun refers to someone or something other than the speaker, the writer, the listener, or the reader. It has two numbers: singular (he, she, it) and plural (they).



Each personal pronoun has three cases: nominative, objective, and possessive. Here is a table that shows the forms of personal pronouns according to their person, number, and case:


Person Number Nominative Objective Possessive --- --- --- --- --- First Singular I me my/mine First Plural we us our/ours Second Singular/Plural you you your/yours Third Singular he/she/it him/her/it his/her/hers/its Third Plural they them their/theirs Reflexive and emphatic pronouns




A reflexive pronoun is a pronoun that refers back to the subject of a verb or a preposition. It is used to show that the action affects the doer of the action. For example: He cut himself while shaving. or She bought a gift for herself.


An emphatic pronoun is a pronoun that is used to emphasize the noun or pronoun it follows. It is used to add extra stress or importance to the word. For example: I myself wrote this article. or You yourself can decide what to do.


The forms of reflexive and emphatic pronouns are the same. They are formed by adding self or selves to the possessive forms of personal pronouns. Here is a table that shows the forms of reflexive and emphatic pronouns according to their person and number:


Person Number Reflexive/Emphatic --- --- --- First Singular myself First Plural ourselves Second Singular/Plural yourself/yourselves Third Singular himself/herself/itself Third Plural themselves Demonstrative, interrogative, and relative pronouns




A demonstrative pronoun is a pronoun that points out something or someone. It has two numbers: singular (this, that) and plural (these, those). For example: This is my book. or Those are your shoes.


An interrogative pronoun is a pronoun that asks a question. It has five forms: who, whom, whose, which, and what. For example: Who are you? or What do you want?


A relative pronoun is a pronoun that introduces a subordinate clause that modifies a noun or a pronoun in the main clause. It has five forms: who, whom, whose, which, and that. For example: The man who lives next door is my uncle. or The book that I bought yesterday is very interesting.


Chapter 4: The Adjective




Degrees of comparison




An adjective is a word that modifies or describes a noun or a pronoun. It can show the degree or level of quality or quantity of the noun or pronoun it modifies. There are three degrees of comparison of adjectives: positive, comparative, and superlative.


  • A positive degree adjective shows the normal or basic quality or quantity of something or someone. For example: She is tall.



  • A comparative degree adjective shows the higher or lower quality or quantity of something or someone in comparison to another thing or person. It is usually formed by adding er or more to the positive degree adjective. For example: She is taller than her sister.



  • A superlative degree adjective shows the highest or lowest quality or quantity of something or someone in comparison to all the other things or people in a group. It is usually formed by adding est or most to the positive degree adjective. For example: She is the tallest girl in the class.



Some adjectives have irregular forms of comparison that do not follow the rules above. For example: good - better - best; bad - worse - worst; little - less - least.


Adjectives of quality and quantity




An adjective can be classified into different kinds based on its meaning or function. There are two main kinds of adjectives in English: adjectives of quality and adjectives of quantity.


  • An adjective of quality is an adjective that describes the kind, color, size, shape, condition, or characteristic of a noun or a pronoun. For example: beautiful, red, big, round, old, clever.



  • An adjective of quantity is an adjective that shows the amount or number of a noun or a pronoun. It can be either exact or indefinite. For example: two, many, some, enough, all.



Position and order of adjectives




An adjective can be placed before or after the noun or pronoun it modifies. The position of an adjective affects its meaning and function in a sentence.


  • An adjective that is placed before the noun or pronoun it modifies is called an attributive adjective. It usually gives essential information about the noun or pronoun. For example: a black cat; an old man; a good book.



  • An adjective that is placed after the noun or pronoun it modifies is called a predicative adjective. It usually gives extra information about the noun or pronoun. It is often connected to the noun or pronoun by a linking verb such as be, seem, look, etc. For example: The cat is black; The man is old; The book is good.



Sometimes, more than one adjective can be used to modify the same noun or pronoun. In this case, there is a certain order that should be followed to avoid confusion and ambiguity. The order of adjectives is usually as follows:


Order Type Example --- --- --- 1 Determiner a, an, the, my, your, etc. 2 Opinion beautiful, ugly, good, bad, etc. 3 Size big, small, large, tiny, etc. 4 Shape round, square, oval, triangular, etc. 5 Age old, young, new, ancient, etc. ```html black, etc. 7 Origin American, British, Chinese, etc. 8 Material wood, metal, plastic, etc. 9 Purpose cooking, writing, sleeping, etc. For example: a beautiful big round old red Chinese wooden cooking bowl.


Chapter 5: The Verb




Principal parts of verbs




A verb is a word that shows an action or a state of being. A verb can have different forms depending on its tense, aspect, voice, and mood. There are four principal parts of verbs that are used to form all the other forms of verbs: base form, past tense form, past participle form, and present participle form.


  • A base form verb is the simplest and most basic form of a verb. It is also called the infinitive without to. It is used to form the present tense (except for the third person singular), the imperative mood, and the subjunctive mood. For example: write, speak, be, have.



  • A past tense verb is the form of a verb that shows that the action or state of being happened in the past. It is used to form the past tense and the past subjunctive mood. For example: wrote, spoke, was/were, had.



  • A past participle verb is the form of a verb that shows that the action or state of being is completed or finished. It is used to form the perfect aspect, the passive voice, and some adjectives. For example: written, spoken, been, had.



  • A present participle verb is the form of a verb that shows that the action or state of being is ongoing or continuous. It is formed by adding ing to the base form verb. It is used to form the progressive aspect and some adjectives. For example: writing, speaking, being, having.



Some verbs have regular forms of principal parts that follow the rules above. For example: play - played - played - playing; work - worked - worked - working. Some verbs have irregular forms of principal parts that do not follow the rules above. For example: go - went - gone - going; sing - sang - sung - singing.


Tense and aspect




A tense is a grammatical category that shows the time of an action or a state of being. There are three main tenses in English: present tense, past tense, and future tense.


  • A present tense verb shows that the action or state of being happens in the present or is true in general. For example: I write every day. or The sun rises in the east.



  • A past tense verb shows that the action or state of being happened in the past. For example: I wrote a letter yesterday. or The sun rose at 6 a.m.



  • A future tense verb shows that the action or state of being will happen in the future. It is formed by using will or shall with the base form verb. For example: I will write a book someday. or The sun will set at 8 p.m.



An aspect is a grammatical category that shows how an action or a state of being relates to time. There are two main aspects in English: simple aspect and progressive aspect.


```html the past tense, and will or shall with the base form verb for the future tense. For example: I write; I wrote; I will write.


A progressive aspect verb shows that the action or state of being is ongoing or continuous. It is formed by using am, is, or are with the present participle verb for the present tense, was or were with the present participle verb for the past tense, and will be or shall be with the present participle verb


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